Issue 4 out now!

Sarah McBride, Taylor Small, and Ritchie Torres will take up high-ranking political positions in their respective states.


By Marissa Lee.

Adding to the number of positive political headlines to occur this week, including the re-election of AOC and her political WOC super-squad, is the election of Sarah McBride as the first-ever openly transgender senator. McBride beat Republican candidate Steve Washington in the Delaware election by a landslide of 73%, according to the Delaware Department of Elections. McBride, who is a spokesperson for and former National Press Secretary of the Human Rights Campaign, will be the first openly LGBTQIA+ person elected to the legislature in Delaware.

Vermont native Taylor Small marks another win for change, as she becomes the first openly transgender representative for Vermont, as announced on November 3rd. Small previously worked as the director of the health and wellness program at the Pride Center of Vermont as well as various mental health counselling and support services. Away from her professional life, the new elect also has a drag persona named Nikki Champagne and uses the character to promote local libraries and youth literacy as well as hosting fundraisers to support Vermont’s non-profit organizations and the LGBTQIA+ community.

Last on the list is Ritchie Torres, who recently won the House race for Congress, becoming the first gay Black and Latino man to do so. This comes after Torres defeated Republican competitor Patrick Delices and captured New York’s 15th Congressional District, the Bronx, which is known to be one of the poorest yet most Democrat-leaning in the country. When asked about his win, Torres told CNN, “I hope I can represent the possibility that a poor kid, a kid of color, a LGBTQ kid from a place like the Bronx, can overcome the odds and become a member of the United States Congress.”

As America’s political tides turn once more, there is not only more hope for tolerance, but also progress and inclusion in the country’s high-ranking political circles.